But what about the unusual surfing destinations that you don’t hear about that often? Could they rival the popular ones? We are glad to present to you 5 unusual surfing destinations that you might like to add to your surfing bucket list. 

 

Austin, Texas, USA

 

surfing-texas

Image source: NLandsurfpark.com

Austin, Texas, a surf destination?! Surely you mean, Galveston? Nope, inland Texas has become a popular, yet unusual surfing destination thanks to the NLand Surf Park, America’s first inland surf park! The artificial surf park opened in October and has since gathered quite a massive fan base. Doug Coors, engineer and surfer, partnered up with Spanish engineer firm Wavegarden and together they created a wonderful inland artificial surf park. If you’re not ready to take on the artificial waves, you can get up on the observation walkway and get an awesome aerial view of the surfers.

 

Iceland

 

surfing-iceland

 

One wouldn’t consider a cold and empty beach a lovely place to do a bit of surfing. But then again, it is a list of unusual surfing destinations! The Guardian called Iceland the last surfing frontier and if you’re a die-hard surfer who isn’t really affected by the cold weather, then Iceland should be your next surfing destination. Apparently, the only drawback about surfing in Iceland is the bad weather. Otherwise, the waves are stunning and the landscape, fantastic. You’ll even get to see a few fellow surfers if you’re lucky.

 

Munich, Germany

 

surfing-Germany

Image source: Wikipedia

Munich, Germany has become a popular surfing destination because of a little man-made river called Eisbach, located in the English Garden, the city’s largest public park. The river features a man-made wave section that gets visitors from all over the world. For all those who’ve been wanting to try river surfing, and also for those who are simply interested in surfing usual waters, we highly recommend you give the Eisbach a try. You’ll surely love it!

 

Montreal, Canada (Habitat 67)

 

surfing-Canada

Image source: KSF.com

In Montreal, Canada there is a standing wave on the Saint Lawrence River called Habitat 67. Unlike the Eisbach, Habitat 67 is a natural standing wave on a river that draws crowds of surfers and kayakers. It’s created by the water moving at high speeds and hitting the boulders underwater. The waves created by this movement can reach a height of up to 6.5 feet (2 meters). The Habitat 67 wave was first surfed in 2002, by Olympic kayaker Corran Addison. His surf school, KSF, has since taught over 150,000 students! So, if you want to be one of those special few to surf the Habitat 67, head on over to Canada!

 

Norway

 

surfing-norway

 

One of the most spectacular shows that nature put on has to be the Northern Lights. They are mesmerizing and unpredictable. Imagine how wonderful surfing would be under the Northern Lights! Well, you don’t need to put your imagination to work, because someone has already done it and the photographic proof is just stunning. Surfer Mick Fanning showed the surf world that you can find surfing magic in places where you least expect. It took Fanning and the photographers two days to snap the above photo, but it was worth it. It looks like something out of a dream!

 


Which one would you like to try this year? Or maybe you prefer more traditional surfing destinations, such as Bali or Portugal? Check our BookSurfCamps.com’s extensive surf camp and vacations offer!